Category: Athletics

Bowling tricks

| April 1, 2015 | 1 Reply

This man, Andy Varipapa, is rather amazing.

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Free climb of “Dawn Wall”

| January 20, 2015 | Reply

I’m not a climber. This climb at Yosemite is beyond words.

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About sports

| September 9, 2014 | Reply

This silly video does make some good points about spectator sports.

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Race Day

| August 23, 2014 | 2 Replies

I just finished running a 5K in downtown St. Louis, finishing at 26:12.

My concern is that there are people running the race who have runners’ physiques–they have long legs and they glide like they aren’t even touching the ground.  An even bigger concern is that some of the people they allow to enter the race are able to run much faster than me.  For instance, the man that won my age bracket finished in 19 min.  It’s not fair that they let people like that enter the race. Even worse, the race was filled with morning people–They walk around annoying owls like me by being chipper at 7am.  I’m going to propose that they begin their next 5K annual race at 10pm, that they screen out all of the larks, and that they ban all of the people who are unfairly fast.

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Running a loop the loop

| February 22, 2014 | Reply

Is it possible to run the loop? This video proves that the answer is affirmative.

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On the need to pretend that children are professional athletes

| November 30, 2013 | Reply

As I watched these guys in the park today, I was reminded of many of the things they didn’t need to get a great workout and to play some serious soccer: uniforms, referees, cheering parents, scoreboard, official schedules and trophies.

IMG_5307  Tower Grove Soccer

IMG_5312  Tower Grove Soccer

IMG_5321  Tower Grove Soccer

IMG_5325  Tower Grove Soccer

They brought some orange plastic cones to serve as the goals. These players knew that it didn’t need to be “perfect” to be worthwhile. And they focused on the process of playing, not the score. There was great camaraderie between all the players on the field. They didn’t need any of the things so many parents and children think they NEED to play soccer in America.

I draw from experience similar to what I saw today. The guys in my neighborhood would put together pick-up games all the time. Soccer, baseball, football and street hockey. No parents, not referees, no scoreboards. We officiated our own games. If there were a dispute, we worked it out together. We picked the teams to make competitive matches. We knew who played well and not so well, and we divided them evenly.

As you can tell, I have some misgivings about how obsessed we have come about the “importance” of having out children play sports the “proper” way, which often includes “select” leagues and 20 mile trips to and from the site of the games.

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Definition of Bandaloop

| September 21, 2013 | Reply

Bandaloop: Highly skilled and courageous people who like to dance on the sides of buildings. Bandaloop performed in St. Louis today, at Grand Center’s annual Dancing in the Street Festival.

For a larger gallery of images, click the title to this post and scroll to the bottom.

IMG_1010 Bandaloop

IMG_0999Dancing in the Street

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Hanging Around

| March 26, 2013 | Reply

This Ukrainian daredevil inflicts vertigo on the rest of us.

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Post-Olympics

| August 14, 2012 | Reply
Post-Olympics

For all of you Americans who insist that you watched the Olympics because of the athleticism, I’d like to know whether NBC’s coverage left you with goosebumps? How many times did you root out loud, along with the announcers, for the American athlete to win? How many times did you weep while listening to the United States National Anthem? How many times did you think it perfectly normal for the announcers to obsess over the 18th place American, while glossing over the best athletes in a sport?

You insist that this is not about jingoism, not about nationalism, but only about sport? Then how many times over the next 3 1/2 years are you going to watch a game of water-polo or tune into a synchronized diving match? Never? Because you really don’t actually give a shit about the sport? Then are you SURE that you were watching the Olympics because of the athleticism?

Did you hang on till the end of the broadcast day for the “medal count?” Did you say “Yeah!” when the U.S. had a couple more gold medals than the Chinese? Did you feel that YOU accomplished something by watching athletes who don’t know you receive awards? Did it ever occur to you that these medal tallies are raw numbers, and that maybe it would be more relevant to athleticism to show medals per one-million population? Or how about medals per college graduate? Or medals per installed solar panel? How would the U.S. do in such a case?

It’s all good fun until you realize that the best part of the broadcast would actually be experienced by turning off the sound, ignoring the color of the uniforms and reminding yourself that the coverage is wildly skewed toward the coverage of Americans–in short, realizing that NBC has been satisfying your nationalistic craving by skewing it’s coverage. It’s no longer athleticism when the athletes wrap themselves in their own countries’ flags and strut around with a victory lap.

Then it becomes clearer that this Olympic broadcast was not designed to cover athletes. It was designed to cover American athletes, and especially those who have a chance to medal. It’s not really about the athletes or athletics, or else you’d be seeking out these sports year round. It’s not about the athletes, but about the TV viewer, and 20 minutes of commercials per hour, and flag waving and “We’re better than you. And even obese Americans that are sitting couches are thinking that they are better than people from other countries sitting on their couches.

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