Category: Meaning of Life

Sam Harris intends to reclaim the use of the word “spiritual”

| April 5, 2014 | Reply

Sam Harris will soon be writing a book to argue for a legitimate secular use of the word “spiritual.” In this article, he points out that many atheists have used the term, pointing out some distinctions along the way.

Share

Read More

Lee Camp defends sheep, hammers people who fall in line

| April 4, 2014 | Reply

As Lee Camp says, the sheep have good excuses for falling in line. People allow TV commercials tell them how to live their lives. It’s not that the commercials directly tell you what to do, but that when you think that you need to buy things you don’t need, you have committed yourself to a series of bad choices, often including a job you work for the money only.

http://leecamp.net/moc-295-you-dont-even-know-youre-being-manipulated/

Share

Read More

La Crosse, Wisconsin: the town that is willing to talk about death

| March 27, 2014 | Reply

Excellent story by NPR. It’s a long way from the Republican scare stories about “death panels”:

People in La Crosse, Wisconsin are used to talking about death. In fact, 96 percent of people who die in this small, Midwestern city have specific directions laid out for when they pass. That number is astounding. Nationwide, it’s more like 50 percent.

In today’s episode, we’ll take you to a place where dying has become acceptable dinner conversation for teenagers and senior citizens alike. A place that also happens to have the lowest healthcare spending of any region in the country.

This piece reminds me that one of the main problems with the United States is that we cannot have meaningful conversations. This is refreshingly different. And important: One-quarter of health care spending occurs in the last year of life.

Share

Read More

Mid-life lessons

| March 2, 2014 | Reply

At the NYT, Pamela Druckerman tells us some of the lessons we finally pick up in mid-life. Many of these are easier to state than to put into practice, but it’s a worthy list.

If you worry less about what people think of you, you can pick up an astonishing amount of information about them. You no longer leave conversations wondering what just happened. Other people’s minds and motives are finally revealed.

• People are constantly trying to shape how you view them. In certain extreme cases, they seem to be transmitting a personal motto, such as “I have a relaxed parenting style!”; “I earn in the low six figures!”; “I’m authentic and don’t try to project an image!”

• Eight hours of continuous, unmedicated sleep is one of life’s great pleasures. Actually, scratch “unmedicated.”

I posted this at Facebook, and a friend posted an article titled, “What you Learn when You’re 60.” It contains a lot more good advice, including the following:

Death is not distant, it’s inevitable, and ever-closer.

No one knows anything. Confidence is a front. Everybody is insecure.

No one cares about your SAT scores unless they aced the test.

We’re all lonely looking to be connected. . . .

You’re never going to recover from some physical ills, aches and pains are part of the process of dying, and that’s what you’re doing, every day.

Share

Read More

Wristwatch that tells you how long you have to live

| February 19, 2014 | Reply

I was an early kickstart investor in a most unusual wristwatch, meaning that I bought one of these watches at a discount. This device was recently featured in The Atlantic:

A new watch called Tikker claims to have created a way to calculate approximately when, according to its creators, a person is likely to die, and then to input that date into a wristwatch. The idea is that being constantly reminded of his or her own mortality will nudge the wearer to live life to the fullest.

Here’s Tikker’s own website featuring its watch.

I’ve thought that it would be a good idea to have one these devices ever since a friend of mine (Tom Ball) told me 30 years ago that it would be cool to have a watch that ran backwards, estimating the amount of time you had to live. He said that when you found yourself at a boring party, you would glance at your backwards-running watch and say, “Sorry, I’ve got to go. I’ve only got X years to live.”

This device will soon be mine, and I’ll see whether I cherish it or whether it annoys me.

Share

Read More

Ken Ham’s Lack of Wonder

| February 7, 2014 | 1 Reply
Ken Ham’s Lack of Wonder

By now, I’m sure, many people know about the debate between Bill Nye and Ken Ham.  Only 9% of respondents apparently saw Ham as the winner.  Of course that won’t be the end of it. 

Share

Read More

Search for her former self

| February 6, 2014 | Reply

What happens when a person forgets who they are, but the new version become an excellent writer? The result is an article well worth reading. I found this true story to be captivating.

Share

Read More

Fix for Sisyphus

| February 6, 2014 | Reply

I liked this cartoon. It hits a deep issue, I think.

Share

Read More

Lee Camp on Why we are Here

| December 25, 2013 | Reply

This is a Lee Camp episode from Nov, 2013. Entertaining and quite serious, like all of his work:

Share

Read More