Category: music

About Farrell Morris

| May 22, 2014 | 1 Reply

The first five notes of Margaritaville are well known. You know, da-da-da-DA-da . . . Farrell Morris was the marimba player who played those notes (and a lot of others) on the iconic recording sung by Jimmy Buffett. I had the opportunity to get to know Farrell, but it was because he was a sculptor as well as a Nashville musician. He and his wife Bobbe traveled to art fairs to sell his works, including the annual Shaw Art Fair on the street where I live (Flora Place). I met them both about 15 years ago, liked Farrell’s work and bought a sculpture (see photo).

IMG_2136 Farrell Morris sculpture

I thought of Farrell today when moving his sculpture to another part of the house. I looked him up on Google and was sad to read that he had been battling cancer and died in 2012. The first time we met, he played a djembe we handed to him, and it was amazing to watch what he did with it. With merely two hands, he struck, stretched, tapped and palmed the skin of the drum to make amazing sounds–in fact, it sounded like multiple instruments. Beautiful rhythms of a veteran percussionist. He was truly a gentleman too. He loved life and loved art. He and his wife returned to STL several times. I spent quite a bit of time visiting with them between customers. They were a wonderful couple. I remember on their last trip here, maybe 12 years ago, Farrell was not playing music anymore because of arthritis that affected his hands. My assumption was that this must have been devastating, but he seemed to be taking things in stride. After all, he was already had a long successful career as a Nashville musician, with hundreds of recordings on his discography, including many musicians who were household names.

This has been my brief tribute to Farrell Morris. Maybe you’ll think of him too when you next hear the first few notes of Margaritaville.

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Music from 1979

| May 4, 2014 | Reply

It was back in 1979, a day when Joni Mitchell performed with Pat Metheny, Jaco Pastorius Don Alias , Lyle Mays and Michael Brecker. This was sweet music indeed.

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Do you like fast food? Music too? Then you’ll enjoy this short video.

| January 12, 2014 | Reply

This musician had some fun with an unsuspecting fast food worker.    Delightful moment:

video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo player

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Country music is all the same?

| December 23, 2013 | Reply

I found this humorous video on FB. The hypothesis is that all country music (at least mainstream country music) is the same. Nicely edited and lots of fun:

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Creative swan songs

| December 9, 2013 | Reply

Does Terror Management Theory (TMT) push creativity to a head in later life. I recently ran across an article that suggests exactly this in Adult Personality Development: Volume 2: Applications, by Lawrence S. Wrightsman, Mar 15, 1994. Here’s the relevant excerpt:

Creativity can undergo a resurgence in the later years of life, and especially in life’s last years (Simonton, 1990, p. 630). Sometimes during the late 60s and 70s an increase in output appears (Simonton, 1988). This secondary peak In output may be a manifestation of an Eriksonian final-stage contemplation of death and review of one’s life accomplishments.

Does any empirical evidence exist for the existence of such a “swan song” phenomenon? Simonton (1989) examined 1,919 compositions by 172 classical music composers, assessed each of numerous aesthetic qualities, and determined how many years before the composers’ death the piece was composed. A clear pattern emerged:

As the composers approached their final years, when death was raising a fist to knock on the door, they began to produce compositions that are more brief, that have simpler and more restrained melodic lines, and yet that score high in aesthetic significance according to musicologists and that eventually become popular mainstays of the classical repertoire. It is as if when the composers see the end approaching fast on the horizon, warning that their last artistic temperaments dwell among their current works in progress, they put their utmost into every creation, yielding truly noteworthy products. (Simonton, 1990, p. 630).

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Wire Pilots

| November 30, 2013 | Reply

For me, it’s always a challenge shooting in the dark without a flash. I had some good practice tonight at a local concert. Guitarist Dan Rubright, percussionist Ted Rubright and bass player Rick Vice comprise “Wire Pilots,” and they put on an excellent show featuring music composed by Dan Rubright. Dan’s music (all of it instrumental) is difficult to classify, but it tends to be centered around salient memorable melodies supported by complex chordal and percussive textures. A special guest for one song was violinist Daniel Schmidt, a 10th grade student at Grand Center Arts Academy. The location was the Kranzberg Arts Center Studio in St. Louis.

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IMG_5184  Wire Pilots - Rubright

[More . . . ]

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Resonating to drumming

| July 23, 2013 | Reply
Resonating to drumming

While the drummers played their Afro-Cuban magic at the World’s Fair Pavilion (my previous post), this is the joy I felt (though I’m too self-conscious to dance when others are watching, damn it). The father of this little boy named Evan gave me permission to capture these moments.

IMG_4276 drummers Soularo

IMG_4279 drummers Soularo

IMG_4287 drummers Soularo

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Sunset drumming

| July 23, 2013 | Reply

Last night I road my bike across town to the World’s Fair Pavilion in Forest Park in St. Louis to take some photos. I didn’t know what I’d find–I assumed I’d be shooting a sunset. It’s a spectacular overlook at one of the many edges of one of the largest city parks in the U.S. I did find a compelling sunset, but what was equally compelling was a group of first rate drummers that go by the name of “Soularo,” including Nafi Rafat and Marcus Jones. They gave me permission to photograph part of their session.

IMG_4237 drummers Soularo-3

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As Jones noted hours later, drumming is like heartbeat. That is true, and it is also a powerful elixir, capable of erasing one’s woes and filling one with thirst for good-hearted life. That’s what seemed clear from watching the dozens of people who were drawn to this spontaneous gathering.

IMG_4225 drummers Soularo

IMG_4191 drummers Soularo

Only a few weeks ago, I spent time at this same location honoring the life of Sonny Glassberg, who recently passed away (she was the mother of a friend of mine). She gave substantial financial support to allow the renovation of this extraordinary venue.

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Delightful unplayable music

| March 30, 2013 | Reply

Those of you who read music might enjoy John Stump’s score titled “Faerie’s Aire and Death Waltz (from “A tribute to Zdenko G. Fibich”). I ran across this and enjoyed its repeated moments of musical absurdity.

Faerie aire

I searched for some background for the piece and found this:

The composition Faerie’s Aire and Death Waltz (from “A Tribute to Zdenko G. Fibich”) by John Stump is an unpublished satirical work written and copyrighted in 1980 that is best known for, simultaneously, its humor and unplayability. The piece is most often seen hanging on the walls in music rooms and orchestral settings for the musicians’ amusement, due to musical directions such as “Rigatoni”, “light explosives now… and… now”, “insert peanuts”, “Moon-walk”, “release the penguins”, and “Like a Dirigible”.

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