RSSCategory: Art

Charles Glenn Continues to Earn the Spotlight

May 4, 2017 | By | 1 Reply More

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch recently featured this article on Charles Glenn, best known these days for singing the national anthem a cappella at Blues games. He has a strong clear voice even now, in his early 60’s. I applaud his successes for many reasons. He is genuinely an upbeat generous man, a dedicated dad with a wonderful sense of humor and unrelenting creativity.

Back in the 1970s, when we were mere teenagers, Charles and I were co-leaders of the 8-piece St. Louis jazz-rock band “Ego.” I was the guitarist and Charles was lead singer (of course), which he excelled at while playing a full set of drums. I’m really proud of what we accomplished. And I continue to celebrate Charles Glenn’s many successes.

[caption id="attachment_28180" align="aligncenter" width="602"] Ego, Circa 1974[/caption]
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Zach the King (of Magic)

April 9, 2017 | By | Reply More

I just stumbled across Zach the King. Delightful video editing and fun vignettes.

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“Mercy,” short violin-piano piece by Max Richter

March 1, 2017 | By | Reply More

I’m loving this musical offering by Max Richter (performed by Hilary Hahn and C. Smythe). So short, sweet and deep.

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On the stealing of jokes and cryptonesia

December 26, 2016 | By | Reply More

What is a trope? The website TV Tropes explains:

A trope is a storytelling device or convention, a shortcut for describing situations the storyteller can reasonably assume the audience will recognize. Tropes are the means by which a story is told by anyone who has a story to tell.

How often have you watched a new movie or TV show and noticed that it is drenched in tropes? I notice this constantly. TV shows and movies resemble other movies and shows so often that some have written, tongue in cheek, that there are actually only an extremely limited number of plots. Are there only seven plots? Are there only six plots?

[More . . . ]

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What you can make out of wet newspaper …

October 21, 2016 | By | Reply More

This is some rather amazing sculpture. Take a look.

rolled-newspaper-animal-sculptures-paper-trails-chie-hitotsuyama-11

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Waters of March – Video

October 15, 2016 | By | Reply More

I love this tune and this video.

The male singer is “Tom Jobim,” who is also the composer of that beautiful celebratory tune and many other classic bossa nova tunes, more often known in the U.S. as Antonio Carlos Jobim. I had never before heard him sing until I saw this video. The female singer, Elis Regina, melts me with her charm and voice. This must have been a tough tune and they seemed delighted to get this one in the can so beautifully intact. My girlfriend insists that there is no way to sing this song well without dancing while one is singing it. I agree.

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George Carlin discusses cops . . . and Jesus

August 28, 2016 | By | Reply More

Newly released material from the work of George Carlin, includes this bit.

For more, see here.

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Walk in the Garden

July 6, 2016 | By | Reply More

I can see the stone wall of the Missouri Botanical Garden from my front porch. It often beckons to me. Though my walks are often brisk, I bring a camera to slow me down to catch a brilliant color, an engaging pattern or a playful reflection. Sometimes, I sit for 5 or 10 minutes and try to meditate.

IMG_0266 MBG Music night

At the MBG, there’s people watching, of course, and this often causes me to think of the people I care most about–how could this not be the case in such a beautiful place?

IMG_0358 MBG Music night

But the two things come to my mind almost every time I visit the garden:

1. David Attenborough’s “Private Life of Plants.” (It’s about the only thing I keep my VCR for – it’s not available in Zone 1 on DVD). It’s a beautiful video series that blurs the line between flora and fauna, when plant growth is run in fast-motion.

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Many ways to take a portrait

November 6, 2015 | By | Reply More

How are portrait photographers influenced by their preconceptions about the subject. Quite a bit, it turns out, based on this clever experiment.

“Portraits can be shaped by the photographer’s point of view rather than just by the subject being documented. Created by The Lab in conjunction with Canon Australia, the clip features six photographers, one portrait subject and an unexpected twist. The twist consisted of the (mis)information each photographer was given regarding the person being photographed.”

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