Recapturing humility for Christianity

November 7, 2006 | By | Reply More

Andrew Sullivan uses a Barack Obama’s interview on the meaning of religion as a launching point for a recent post.  Here are Obama’s words:

“I think this is the historical moment we’re in — we have come to define religion in absolutist, fundamentalist terms. So to be a believer is to be a fundamentalist in some fashion. And I guess what I was trying to describe is a faith that admits doubt, and uncertainty, and mystery. Because, ultimately, I think that’s how most people understand their faith. In fact, it’s not faith if you’re absolutely certain. There’s a leap that we all take, and, when you admit that doubt publicly, it’s a form of testimony.

Then what I think it does is it allows both the secular and the religious to find some sort of common space where we say to each other, Well, I may not believe exactly what you do, what you believe, but I share an experience in wondering what does my life mean, or I understand the desire for a connection to something larger than myself. And that, I think, is in the best of the United States religious tradition.”

Sullivan is impressed with Obama’s thoughtfulness and candor.  So am I.  Sullivan believes that a “quiet rebellion among moderate and tolerant Christians is taking place.”  I hope so.

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Category: Politics, Religion, Uncategorized

About the Author ()

Erich Vieth is an attorney focusing on consumer law litigation and appellate practice. He is also a working musician and a writer, having founded Dangerous Intersection in 2006. Erich lives in the Shaw Neighborhood of St. Louis, Missouri, where he lives half-time with his two extraordinary daughters.

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