RSSCategory: Sustainable Living

Hurdles to installing solar panels on one’s roof in Missouri

August 1, 2013 | By | Reply More

Are you thinking of putting solar panels on your roof? It would be a great idea for many reasons. Before you begin the process, though, read the story of Frances Babb, who had to fight hard to get the job done in the west St. Louis County area of Clarkson Valley.

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We could get rid of fossil fuels . . .

July 8, 2013 | By | Reply More

What is it called when you can save many lives, but you don’t? Homocide? Terracide? Scientists insist that we can wean ourselves from fossil fuels, and it would be a win win win. It’s going to be very difficult when we are bombarded with so incredibly much “clean-coal” and “clean natural gas” propaganda. But here’s what we COULD do, from Stanford:

If someone told you there was a way you could save 2.5 million to 3 million lives a year and simultaneously halt global warming, reduce air and water pollution and develop secure, reliable energy sources – nearly all with existing technology and at costs comparable with what we spend on energy today – why wouldn’t you do it?

According to a new study coauthored by Stanford researcher Mark Z. Jacobson, we could accomplish all that by converting the world to clean, renewable energy sources and forgoing fossil fuels.

“Based on our findings, there are no technological or economic barriers to converting the entire world to clean, renewable energy sources,” said Jacobson, a professor of civil and environmental engineering. “It is a question of whether we have the societal and political will.”

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Peak water

July 6, 2013 | By | Reply More

From the U.K. Guardian:

In a major new essay Lester Brown, head of the Earth Policy Institute in Washington, claims that 18 countries, together containing half the world’s people, are now overpumping their underground water tables to the point – known as “peak water” – where they are not replenishing and where harvests are getting smaller each year. . .

“The world is seeing the collision between population growth and water supply at the regional level. For the first time in history, grain production is dropping in a geographic region with nothing in sight to arrest the decline. Because of the failure of governments in the region to mesh population and water policies, each day now brings 10,000 more people to feed and less irrigation water with which to feed them.”

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Talking points to rebut climate deniers

June 12, 2013 | By | 2 Replies More

Here is a succinct set of talking points for rebutting climate deniers.

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About the renewed Fossil Fuel Resistance

May 26, 2013 | By | Reply More

Bill McKibben explains the degree of the threat of fossil fuel in the April 25, 2013 issue of Rolling Stone.  Here’s the opening paragraph:

It got so hot in Australia in January that the weather service had to add two new colors to its charts. A few weeks later, at the other end of the planet, new data from the CryoSat-2 satellite showed 80 percent of Arctic sea ice has disappeared. We’re not breaking records anymore; we’re breaking the planet. In 50 years, no one will care about the fiscal cliff or the Euro crisis. They’ll just ask, “So the Arctic melted, and then what did you do?”

And consider the opportunities being lost to a continued dependence on fossil fuels:

It’s an economic resistance movement, too, one that’s well aware renewable energy creates three times as many jobs as coal and gas and oil. Good jobs that can’t be outsourced because the sun and the wind are close to home. It creates a future, in other words.

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Lee Camp brings it

May 10, 2013 | By | Reply More

Over the past week, I’ve watched about 20 episodes of Lee Camp’s Moment of Clarity. Camp has the technique down well. Be well informed, then let it fly with equal parts wit and sharp sword. His targets are those who hurt or disparage honorable ordinary people. His videos are well-planned and executed, with the timing of an experienced comedian. Take a look at any of the four posted episodes below, and I suspect that you will become a Lee Camp fan too.

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Germany’s renewable energy revolution

April 20, 2013 | By | Reply More

While we in the U.S. are barely moving forward on renewables, Germany is streaking into the future. Amory Lovins of Rocky Mountain Institute explains:

While the examples of Japan, China, and India show the promise of rapidly emerging energy economies built on efficiency and renewables, Germany—the world’s number four economy and Europe’s number one—has lately provided an impressive model of what a well-organized industrial society can achieve. To be sure, it’s not yet the world champion among countries with limited hydroelectricity: Denmark passed 40% renewable electricity in 2011 en route to a target of 100% by 2050, and Portugal, albeit with more hydropower, raised its renewable electricity fraction from 17% to 45% just during 2005–10 (while the U.S., though backed by a legacy of big hydro, crawled from 9% to 10%), reaching 70% in the rainy and windy first quarter of 2013. But these economies are not industrial giants like Germany, which remains the best disproof of claims that highly industrialized countries, let alone cold and cloudy ones, can do little with renewables.

Here’s an example of how poorly some of us in the U.S. are postured for divesting ourselves of carbon. This is an example from my home state of Missouri, where the utilities and the coal industry apparently owns the place.

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Fox: Why solar power won’t work in the U.S.

February 8, 2013 | By | 2 Replies More

Per FOX, solar is working great in Germany. Why can’t it work in the U.S.? Because Germany has more sunshine. Except that Germany doesn’t. By far. Amazing that such garbage passes as analysis.

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Smaller houses, bigger lives

January 29, 2013 | By | 1 Reply More

This article at Grist features many people who have discovered more happiness and a different attitude toward possessions after moving into tiny houses, as small as 100 square feet. Here’s a short article I wrote in 2007 describing houses as small as 40 square feet.

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