RSSCategory: Sustainable Living

Living really close to the land at Dancing Rabbit

December 6, 2012 | By | 1 Reply More

Tonight I was taught how to get serious about sustainability. Most people I know merely talk the talk, and they would rarely, if ever, consider making significant voluntary changes to their life styles in order to preserve the planet. Solar panels on the roof? It might offend the neighbors. Take public transportation? Outside of a handful of American cities, it is considered beneath one’s dignity to the extent that one can afford to own a car. Refrain from taking a pleasure trip across the world? Why would anyone do that? Car pool? Are you crazy? Ride a bicycle to work? I can’t because I might get sweaty. Eat only local food? I need more variety!

Tonight I listened to Tony Sirna describe Dancing Rabbit, a community of people truly dedicated to shrinking their ecological footprint. He discussed his community, sustainable living options, and what the future holds for all of us. The following is from the introductory literature to the presentation:

Dancing Rabbit Eco-village in Northern Missouri has been at the fore since 1997 and its members are living one vision of a sustainable future right now.

Over the last 15 years Dancing Rabbit has built over 25 energy-efficient homes using reclaimed lumber and natural building methods such as strawbale and cob. By reducing electricity use to less than 10% of the American norm, the village is now a net exporter of renewable energy. Three vehicles are shared among the 75 residents, who drive only 7% of the US average. Food production is integrated into the design of the pedestrian-scale village. Cooperation, a strong gift economy, and a vibrant alternative currency support the economic stability of the community. Natural ecosystems are preserved and restored on the community’s 280-acre land trust. Sustainability is not just a dream. The residents of Dancing Rabbit Ecovillage are living it right now.

I learned that the 75 residents of Dancing Rabbit use only 10% of the energy of the average American. They do this through the power of cooperation–a strongly interconnected community that strongly encourages each other. This is not a religious community. It is not a group that shares it’s income (every individual controls his or her own wealth).

The residents have erected a small village of homes, mostly built of clay, sand and straw. These are small houses by modern standards–about 1/3 the size of new houses in the U.S., but this is the size of a typical house from the 1950s. The community compact forbids the private ownership of cars. Three community vehicles are shared among the 75 residents. Ride sharing is strongly encouraged, and almost no one drives alone.

Water use is only about 12 gallons per day per person, compared to 135 gallons for the typical American. They accomplish this through composting toilets, cisterns for rain and constructive wetlands. They are getting fairly close to having zero carbon buildings. The aim is to be entirely free of fossil fuel. They grow much of the food they eat.

The residents include many college educated people, many of whom work jobs from the isolated village up in Scotland County, Missouri. Some of the residents run a B&B in the village. The original residents were transplants from Stanford University; that was 15 years ago. Sirna indicates that it is an extremely fulfilling lifestyle, where residents live life by their values, among those who share their values. The current plan is to recruit more residents in order to expand the eco-village to 500 residents.

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Annie Leonard: Stay home on Black Friday

November 14, 2012 | By | 1 Reply More

Annie Leonard (“The Story of Stuff”) urges us to stay home on Black Friday, offering us some stunning images in this one-minute video:

What else is there to do? Fifty years ago, people would have thought you were an idiot to even ask this question.

Although I have NEVER shopped on Black Friday, I signed Annie Leonard’s Pledge.

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Preserving a corner of the world

November 7, 2012 | By | Reply More

Would you like to help preserve an ecologically pristine corner of the world? Here’s a project you will appreciate: The Children’s Eternal Rainforest. I’m personally involved with this organization, having conducted the interviews in this video and I composed the music. Take a look and you’ll see that this Costa Rican Rainforest is an extraordinary treasure that can and should be preserved.

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Romney mocking climate change

November 4, 2012 | By | 1 Reply More

Go to 6:15 of this youtube clip and you’ll see Mitt Romney mocking Barack Obama on the issue of climate change at the Republican national convention. As Amy Goodman then points out, however, neither candidate (and none of the moderators) bothered to mention climate change at the debates. This is an incredibly sad state of affairs.

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The doubt industry

October 26, 2012 | By | Reply More

There’s no doubt that humans are changing the climate. I invite you to invest five minutes to see how big industries have historically manipulated doubt. That is exactly what is going on with regard to global warming.

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Weather women insists on talking about climate

October 4, 2012 | By | Reply More

I sometimes imagined this sort of thing happening: a local TV weather-person who insisted on talking seriously about the climate. Today I saw that someone actually performed this skit:

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Romney’s destructive energy plan

September 14, 2012 | By | Reply More

Mitt Romney’s energy plan is the Koch Brother energy plan. It will pollute the planet and crank up global warming. Romney claims that his plan will create jobs. At Rolling Stone, Jeff Goodell denies this claim:

[S]tudies show that investments to spur renewable energy and boost energy efficiency generate far more jobs than oil and coal. A recent report by the Center for American Progress and the University of Massachusetts concluded that $150 billion invested in renewable energy would generate 1.7 million more jobs than the same amount invested in fossil fuels. Another study by the Union of Concerned Scientists found that a national standard requiring utilities to obtain at least 25 percent of their power from wind, solar and bioenergy by 2025 would create 297,000 new jobs, generating $13.5 billion in income for rural landowners and $11.5 billion in new tax revenues for local governments. In addition, the private sector has recognized the lucrative opportunities offered by clean energy: In 2010 – for the first time ever – investments in renewable energy surpassed those in fossil fuels.

Many of Mitt Romney’s other lies regarding energy are examined in this excellent article.

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The war on bottled water

September 6, 2012 | By | 1 Reply More

From Alternet:

In the last year, municipalities across Ontario and the rest of the country have begun taking a much-needed stand to protect local water sources. Since World Water Day in 2011, nine municipalities across Canada have become Blue Communities with many well on their way.

Blue Communities are municipalities that adopt a water commons framework by: banning the sale of bottled water in public facilities and at municipal events, recognizing water as a human right, and promoting publicly financed, owned and operated water and waste-water services.

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Time to remake corporations as stewards of the planet

August 3, 2012 | By | Reply More
Time to remake corporations as stewards of the planet

In the June 7, 2012 edition of Nature (available online only to subscribers),Pavan Sukhdev, chief executive of environmental consulting firm GIST Advisory, offers a formula for turning corporations into environmentally responsible entities. Sukdev points out that our corporations tend to cater to rampant consumerism, and this is immensely damaging to the environment. The effects can be seen in the form of “emissions, freshwater use, pollution, waste and land-use change.” Corporations have also learned to excel at “influencing government regulation, avoiding taxes and obtaining subsidies for harmful activities in order to optimize shareholder returns.”

[More . . . ]

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