Tag: Censorship

Phone hacking censorship at FOX

| September 18, 2011 | Reply
Phone hacking censorship at FOX

From Huffpo:

Rupert Murdoch’s Fox network cut a joke by Alec Baldwin about the company’s phone hacking scandal out of a skit for Sunday’s Emmy Awards, causing Baldwin to pull out of the ceremony.

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Bank of America forbids withdrawal-of-money protest

| August 13, 2011 | 14 Replies
Bank of America forbids withdrawal-of-money protest

On Friday, August 12, 2011, about 50 members of Missourians Organizing for Reform and Empowerment (“MORE”) protested the activities of Bank of America at the downtown branch of the bank in St. Louis , Missouri. Many of the protesters have been longtime customers of Bank of America, and they intended to withdraw all of their […]

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How to rig Digg

| August 5, 2010 | Reply
How to rig Digg

The results of Digg are unfairly skewed. We’re not seeing what the general population votes. Rather at least one highly organized block of users is engaging in censorship.

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Defending Blasphemy

| June 18, 2009 | 1 Reply
Defending Blasphemy

The Center for Inquiry has just announced a new campaign to help defend free speech–particularly speech critical of religion–from suppression. The Campaign for Free Expression includes a website designed as a forum to report and monitor censorship. The site also publishes the kind of religious (and political) criticism likely to find itself censored.

http://www.centerforinquiry.net/newsroom/center_for_inquiry_launches_campaign_for_free_expression/

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Linking to Wikileaks could cost you $11,000

| March 19, 2009 | 1 Reply
Linking to Wikileaks could cost you $11,000

Well, it will if the Australian government gets its way on its internet censorship bill. That’s right. The ACMA seems to have placed Wikileaks on its potential web blacklist and seems set on throwing fines of up to $11,000 at anyone who links to it.

I’d happily go all out on this one, but a fellow Antipodean has already got this one in his sights:

I’m posting this on my American blog because the Australian government, through the Australian Communications and Media Authority is fining people on Australian sites who give the links below the fold $11,000/day. Pretty well everything I feared about censorship by the internet filter and heavy handed government action is coming true.

First of all, it transpires that only one bureaucrat at ACMA is required to block and ban a site, with no further oversight or redress. Second, it turns out that yes, ordinary and popular pornography sites are being blocked, so that if the filter becomes mandatory, these legal sites will effectively become censored for no apparent reason (other than political whim or special privileges). Thirdly, the whistleblower site Wikileaks is blocked by the ACMA blacklist.

John follows with the excerpt from a Crikey article:

Like New Labour in the UK, the ALP has now abandoned that [civil liberties movement], for a number of reasons. Once it committed itself to neoliberal economics (“social capitalism”) Labo(u)r became freaked about the social dissolution and rupture, the desocialisation created by turning the polis into a giant market of winners and losers. The tough answer to this is genuine social democracy, in which people have a social being not entirely defined by whether they’re a “winner” or a “loser”. The easy answer is to let the market rip, allow it to change the culture, and then seek to control and reshape people’s behaviour, selling it to them as “protecting the many against the few”.

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Here’s what often happens when you try to videotape police.

| March 12, 2009 | 10 Replies
Here’s what often happens when you try to videotape police.

Here’s what often happens when you videotape police. The priest who tried to videotape this incident eventually got his camera back, which is more than you can say for many other folks who have tried to photograph law enforcement officers in public places.

Here’s a related post dealing with threats of arrest for taking photos in public places. And be careful when you consider blogging about your First Amendment rights, especially when arrogant judges get wind of it.

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It’s supposedly illegal to take photographs in public spaces

| February 11, 2009 | 12 Replies
It’s supposedly illegal to take photographs in public spaces

I’ve previously read accounts of photographers being harassed. This smart guy turned on his camera’s video function and recorded the outrageous conversation with a security guard. She was pleasant, but instructed him about a “policy” that is utterly bizarre (because this policy, to my knowledge, doesn’t really exist in the law). Keep in mind that, according to this security guard, it’s illegal for a tourist to snap any photos of the historic buildings in Washington D.C. without special clearance.

I’d like to reserve this post as a place for anyone else to post comments if they or someone they know has been warned to not take photos in public spaces, prevented from taking such photos or had their camera(s) confiscated.

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What John F. Kennedy would say to George W. Bush

| April 16, 2008 | 1 Reply
What John F. Kennedy would say to George W. Bush

What John F. Kennedy would, indeed, say to George W. Bush:

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Internet censorship in China

| February 20, 2008 | Reply
Internet censorship in China

The Atlantic has published this detailed article describes how the Internet works and doesn’t work in China.    The bottom line is that, in China, Internet censorship is sporadic yet effective.   “If you want to have traction in China, you have to be in China,” she told me. And being inside China means operating under the sweeping […]

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