Tag: Psychology Cognition

High rate of suicide reported for U.S. veterans

November 16, 2007 | By | 1 Reply More
High rate of suicide reported for U.S. veterans

At least 6256 US veterans committed suicide in 2005 – an average of 17 a day – the network reported, with veterans overall more than twice as likely to take their own lives as the rest of the general population. While the suicide rate among the general population was 8.9 per 100,000, the level among […]

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PreCambrian Ephemera, Satan’s Snares, and Horse Dung

November 15, 2007 | By | 3 Replies More
PreCambrian Ephemera, Satan’s Snares, and Horse Dung

Writer John Scalzi recently visited the Creation Museum.    He  has written his report, assessed his impressions, and concluded…well, you should read his conclusions for yourself, here. I do  not have Mr. Scalzi’s flare for describing expensive nonsense in such finely satirical, subversive, and somewhat detached a manner.  There is also a FlickR show attached worth a […]

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Can you forge character out in the suburbs?

November 15, 2007 | By | 3 Replies More
Can you forge character out in the suburbs?

This question is not really fair.  After all, there are many people out in the suburbs who don’t have it easy and there are many people living in the city who have never had to overcome serious challenges. Nonetheless, it is my prejudice that those people with the highest character, those people we admire the […]

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Are you having difficulty figuring out who you are ? Then take an inventory of your friends.

November 5, 2007 | By | Reply More
Are you having difficulty figuring out who you are ?  Then take an inventory of your friends.

Periodically, I become a bit disoriented in the swirl of life, which gives rise to the question: “Who am I?”  We aren’t static beings, of course.  We are complex adaptive systems, communities of relatively simple cellular life that number in the trillions.  Many of “our” cells (in fact, the great majority of them) don’t even […]

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The “halo effect”: yet another cognitive Achilles’ Heel

November 1, 2007 | By | 3 Replies More
The “halo effect”: yet another cognitive Achilles’ Heel

Here’s another obstacle to objectively evaluating a person.  There are many aspects of people.  If you are attracted to one aspect strongly, you might (subconsciously) allow that characteristic to serve as a token for that person’s other personality characteristics.   As this article from PsyBlog indicates, this is called the “Halo Effect.” The ‘halo effect’ is […]

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The Journey: an outsider attends a different kind of church

October 30, 2007 | By | 56 Replies More
The Journey: an outsider attends a different kind of church

People have all kinds of hobbies.  Some people like to knit.  Other people like to collect stamps.  I like to go to church while playing the role of “anthropologist.” When I am thinking about visiting a church, my biggest decision is deciding what church to visit.  That was my decision three days ago. I had […]

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Don’t stare at dead things or animals having sex.

October 17, 2007 | By | 76 Replies More
Don’t stare at dead things or animals having sex.

I bristled yesterday as I read yet another faux-controversy concocting article in my misguided home town paper, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.  You see, Body Worlds is coming to my town and the morality “experts” are getting restless. The “concern” is that maybe we shouldn’t be staring at dead bodies.  The morality experts quoted by the article are suggesting that the […]

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Please Allow Me To Introduce Myself

October 16, 2007 | By | 5 Replies More
Please Allow Me To Introduce Myself

But what’s puzzlin’ you is the nature of my game… That’s about the only song I can stand to listen to the Rolling Stones do.  Musically, thematically, it all comes together for them.  It’s perfect.  Beyond that, while I certaiinly like a lot of their songs, I cannot abide listening to the Stones.  Particularly, I […]

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Thinking thermostats

October 16, 2007 | By | Reply More
Thinking thermostats

Steven Pinker on consciousness (from an interview in Slate.com): It might not be the actual stuff of the brain that makes us conscious so much as it is the information processing. I don’t think Chalmers’ view [that the physical laws of science will never explain consciousness] would give much support to a traditional religious view […]

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