Tag: Psychology Cognition

Approach everything as though you were a jazz player

December 23, 2007 | By | Reply More
Approach everything as though you were a jazz player

I’m a newcomer to an extremely popular website called Lifehack.  The site specializes in “hacks, tips and tricks that get things done quickly by automating, increase productivity and organizing.”  There is obviously a lot to consider at Lifehack.org.  One might wonder, though, how much time one should spend on productivity lest one’s productivity sags.  Despite this […]

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We atheists and agnostics often have a lot in common with you religious moderates

December 23, 2007 | By | 29 Replies More
We atheists and agnostics often have a lot in common with you religious moderates

I struggle to see through the rampant commercialism, the over-consumption and the glazed-eyed happiness of the holiday season.  But maybe I’ve had a break-through.  It keeps recurring to me this month that kind and thoughtful atheists/agnostics have an immense amount in common with millions of kind and thoughtful people who believe in God.  Too many […]

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“Push capitalism” turns us into full-time consumers and non-citizens

December 21, 2007 | By | 7 Replies More
“Push capitalism” turns us into full-time consumers and non-citizens

Bill Moyers recently interviewed Benjamin Barber, a renowned political theorist and a distinguished senior fellow at Demos — a public policy think tank here in New York City. Barber’s most recent book is Consumed: How Markets Corrupt Children, Infantilize Adults, and Swallow Citizens Whole (2007). What’s the focus of this book? [T]he global economy produces too […]

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The banality of heroism: what’s good for the goose . . .

December 21, 2007 | By | Reply More
The banality of heroism: what’s good for the goose . . .

I’ve been long-intrigued by Hannah Arendt’s concept of the banality of evil.  Philip Zimbardo turns that concept on its head in an article from Edge, “The banality of evil is matched by the banality of heroism.”   (you’ll need to scroll down to the z’s).  Zimbardo’s article appears as one of a series of articles responding […]

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Bizarre handcuff treatment for mental patients in the 1950’s

December 16, 2007 | By | 1 Reply More
Bizarre handcuff treatment for mental patients in the 1950’s

Back in the 1970s, when I was an undergrad student at the University of Missouri, I took a psychology course that required me to interview someone who worked in the mental health field.  A nurse working at the Missouri State Mental Hospital (on Arsenal Street in the City of St. Louis) graciously agreed to talk […]

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How to make a rubber hand magically turn into YOUR hand.

December 16, 2007 | By | 4 Replies More
How to make a rubber hand magically turn into YOUR hand.

Intrigued by my review of numerous articles on neural plasticity, I concocted a simple experiment that had dramatic results.  I set out to see whether I could cause people to have the illusion that a cheap rubber hand could “become” their own hand.  Over the past few years, I’ve run this experiment on about a […]

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Why do conservatives become conservative? It’s not a rational choice.

December 2, 2007 | By | 9 Replies More
Why do conservatives become conservative?  It’s not a rational choice.

Nor is it primarily the result of a rational choice (i.e., a systematic analysis of facts) that liberals become liberals.  We’d like to believe that we adopt our political views rationally, only after careful consideration of the “facts.” That’s a pipe dream, however.  Jay Dixit’s article, “The Ideological Animal,” (published by Psychology Today) demonstrates that our […]

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The Devil In Memphis

November 28, 2007 | By | 5 Replies More
The Devil In Memphis

I received the following from a friend of mine, who sent it to his local paper as well. I’ve asked his permission to post it here, in its entirety. It concerns an issue which, while we may hope represents an unfortunate part of our history long outgrown, still rears its viperous and virulent heads in […]

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The best social psychology studies of all time . . .

November 21, 2007 | By | 4 Replies More
The best social psychology studies of all time . . .

Psyblog presents a handy summary of ten of the most famous social psychology studies. The post is a succinct review of each of the following studies, along with thoughtful commentary.  The social psychological studies include the following:  1. The Halo Effect – Nisbett  2. Cognitive Dissonance – Festinger  3. Robbers Cave – Sherif  4. Stanford Prison […]

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