Tag: photography

Majestic sunset over South St. Louis

| August 30, 2011 | 1 Reply
Majestic sunset over South St. Louis

I’m a big fan of looking at clouds. While I peddled my bicycle home tonight, from downtown St. Louis to my home in the Shaw Neighborhood, I was repeated stunned by the beauty of the sunset. People oooh and ahhh at fireworks, but I don’t believe any fireworks show comes close to what I saw tonight. No need to write any more about it. Instead, I’ll simply paste in the gallery below (if you don’t see the gallery, it’s because you are on the home page–in that case, just click the title of this post and you’ll see the gallery). None of these photos have been retouched in any way, other than cropping.

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Snowy shades of gray

| March 27, 2011 | 3 Replies
Snowy shades of gray

St. Louis had a late-March snow yesterday, leading to some grumbling about the interruption of the long-anticipated Spring. But this was a wind-blown sticky snow that gave rise to some extraordinary photo opportunities. Many of these photos were color photos that looked as if they were taken with black and white film. For instance, this photo of a side entrance to the St. Louis Zoo.

My favorite photo, however was taken by my 10-year old daughter Charlotte, who gave me permission to post it here. This is a completely unretouched photo of a statute in Forest Park. It had a startling 2-D look, especially in this photo (click to enlarge):

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Nantucket sunset on fire

| July 28, 2010 | Reply
Nantucket sunset on fire

I had the opportunity to spend a few days on Nantucket recently. This was my favorite sunset–this photo is entirely un-retouched. The sky really seemed to be on fire.

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Here’s what it looked like a few minutes later:

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Multiplicity photography

| June 9, 2010 | 7 Replies
Multiplicity photography

I assume that this would be as much fun to create as to view. Multiplicity:

is a photography technique in which the same person is photographed from different angles and directions and then the bunch of photographs are digitally re-mastered in Photoshop showing clones of the person doing different things all in one photo.

And speaking of photos, here are 13 of them “that changed the world.”

And here’s one more gallery that caught my eye tonight. It’s called “Abandoned.”

But here’s one more entertaining collection demonstrating that it’s not easy being a photographer.

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Fun and terrifying photography

| May 16, 2010 | Reply
Fun and terrifying photography

A good collection of “well timed” photography here.

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Just to reassure you …

| May 1, 2010 | Reply
Just to reassure you …

While I driving near the Mississippi River near downtown Saint Louis a few days ago, I spotted this sign. Perhaps it was meant to reassure people who were nervous about seeing locomotives operating themselves . . .

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Tilt shift videos, anyone?

| April 21, 2010 | Reply
Tilt shift videos, anyone?

I’d never heard of tilt-shift videos before today. It’s a rather dramatic effect–using a special lens and adjusting the frames-per-second, you can make real-world large object look miniature. Here are several eye-popping examples. I kept thinking that I was looking at miniatures until I saw such realistic people enter the frame.

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Photo on a wing

| March 29, 2010 | Reply
Photo on a wing

I flew to Los Angeles tonight on business. On the way down, this image caught my eye and my camera caught it (click the image for an enlarged version).

Image by Erich Vieth

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Our precious thin atmosphere

| March 1, 2010 | 3 Replies
Our precious thin atmosphere

Click on this link to see a beautiful photo of the Earth by the Goddard Space Flight Center. What is stunning to me is the thin-ness of the Earth’s precious atmosphere. Click on the image for a much-enlarged version.

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How was this photo taken?

This spectacular “blue marble” image is the most detailed true-color image of the entire Earth to date. Using a collection of satellite-based observations, scientists and visualizers stitched together months of observations of the land surface, oceans, sea ice, and clouds into a seamless, true-color mosaic of every square kilometer (.386 square mile) of our planet. These images are freely available to educators, scientists, museums, and the public. This record includes preview images and links to full resolution versions up to 21,600 pixels across.

Much of the information contained in this image came from a single remote-sensing device-NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS. Flying over 700 km above the Earth onboard the Terra satellite, MODIS provides an integrated tool for observing a variety of terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric features of the Earth. The land and coastal ocean portions of these images are based on surface observations collected from June through September 2001 and combined, or composited, every eight days to compensate for clouds that might block the sensor’s view of the surface on any single day. Two different types of ocean data were used in these images: shallow water true color data, and global ocean color (or chlorophyll) data.

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