RSSCategory: Evolution

Ken Ham’s Lack of Wonder

February 7, 2014 | By | 1 Reply More
Ken Ham’s Lack of Wonder

By now, I’m sure, many people know about the debate between Bill Nye and Ken Ham.  Only 9% of respondents apparently saw Ham as the winner.  Of course that won’t be the end of it. 

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Creationist questions, scientist answers

February 6, 2014 | By | Reply More

First, there was the debate:

After Bill Nye’s debate with evidence-free Ken Ham, the Creationists lined up with their questions.

At Slate, Phil Plait provides the answers.

Plait offers links to two excellent resources for those who really care to learn more about evolution:

1. Understanding Evolution. This is a collaborative project of the University of California Museum of Paleontology and the National Center for Science Education.

2. FAQ’s for Creationists by TalkOrigins.
Talk.origins is a Usenet newsgroup devoted to the discussion and debate of biological and physical origins. Most discussions in the newsgroup center on the creation/evolution controversy, but other topics of discussion include the origin of life, geology, biology, catastrophism, cosmology and theology.

Plait ends his article with a link to another of his excellent articles, “Is Science Faith-Based.” Here’s why science is not faith-based:

The scientific method makes one assumption, and one assumption only: the Universe obeys a set of rules. That’s it. There is one corollary, and that is that if the Universe follows these rules, then those rules can be deduced by observing the way Universe behaves. This follows naturally; if it obeys the rules, then the rules must be revealed by that behavior . . . Science is not simply a database of knowledge. It’s a method, a way of finding this knowledge. Observe, hypothesize, predict, observe, revise. Science is provisional; it’s always open to improvement. Science is even subject to itself. If the method itself didn’t work, we’d see it. Our computers wouldn’t work (OK, bad example), our space probes wouldn’t get off the ground, our electronics wouldn’t work, our medicine wouldn’t work. Yet, all these things do in fact function, spectacularly well. Science is a check on itself, which is why it is such an astonishingly powerful way of understanding reality.

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Bill Moyers discusses religion with Isaac Asimov

January 18, 2014 | By | 1 Reply More

In this 1988 interview, Bill Moyers discusses religion with Isaac Asimov. Can religion be “reconciled” with science? Asimov says yes, as long as the players are reasonable and as long as religion is not confused as science.

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The beginnings of multi-cellularity

October 23, 2013 | By | Reply More

Fascinating story told by Carl Zimmer, illustrated by yeast studies.

Scientists suspect that the first step towards a complex multicellular body like ours is for cells to evolve to live in primitive clumps. There may be a lot of advantages to living this way. It may be harder for a predator to eat you, for example. At the University of Minnesota, a team of scientists led by William Ratcliff and Michael Travisano figured out a way to create this kind of natural selection in a lab. As I reported last year in the New York Times, they were able to get yeast–which normally lives as single cells–to turn into simple multicellular clumps in a few weeks.

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Evolution gone awry

July 31, 2013 | By | Reply More

I found this image on Facebook. I don’t know how to give credit where it is due, but I’ll share nonetheless:

evolution screwed up

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Early human-neanderthal ancestor remains identified

April 2, 2013 | By | 1 Reply More

This is an incredible story. Scientists have identified a 30,000-40,000 year old hominid ancestor whose DNA indicates that it is part Human, part Neanderthal.

If further analysis proves the theory correct, the remains belonged to the first known such hybrid, providing direct evidence that humans and Neanderthals interbred. Prior genetic research determined the DNA of people with European and Asian ancestry is 1 to 4 percent Neanderthal.

Those were amazing times in Europe, where humans and Neanderthals co-existed. One wonders whether this co-existence was at all peaceful. Regardless, apparently I (along with many people of European and Asian ancestry) carry some Neanderthal genetic coding.

When I am asked about my “race,” I have sometimes (when I would not receive any sort of benefit or privilege for doing so) indicate “African.” I’ve previously argued that we’d all be better off declaring that we are African, because the categories or “race” are as scientifically deficient as they are culturally divisive. But now, thanks to this new finding, I have the option of indicating that my “race” is Part-human, part Neanderthal, out of Africa via Europe, currently living in the U.S. Or something like that.

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Bill Nye’s frustration with deniers of evolution

March 11, 2013 | By | Reply More

Bill Nye says that we need scientifically literate people–let’s not ruin our children by shoving evolution down their throats:

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Meet the rat-sized common ancestor of mammals

February 7, 2013 | By | Reply More

It lived 66 million years ago, and it might be your ancestor:

Humankind’s common ancestor with other mammals may have been a roughly rat-size animal that weighed no more than a half a pound, had a long furry tail and lived on insects. In a comprehensive six-year study of the mammalian family tree, scientists have identified and reconstructed what they say is the most likely common ancestor of the many species on the most abundant and diverse branch of that tree — the branch of creatures that nourish their young in utero through a placenta. The work appears to support the view that in the global extinctions some 66 million years ago, all non-avian dinosaurs had to die for mammals to flourish.

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Modules and evolution

January 30, 2013 | By | Reply More

In “The Parts of Life,” Karl Zimmer takes a close look at evolving computer networks and concludes that modules and minimal connections facility efficient evolution.

[A]s networks become more efficient, they become more modular. But once the parts of a system emerge, natural selection may then favor modules themselves, because they make living things more flexible in their evolution. Once life’s Legos get produced, in other words, evolution can start to play.

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