Category: Films and Videos

Do it yourself political reporting

| March 2, 2015 | Reply

The City of St. Louis, where I live, will hold its primary elections tomorrow. As usual, reporting on many of the races is scant to nonexistent. Here’s a typical example of “reporting” on the elections, this from St. Louis Public Radio, and it provides almost no information about the positions of the candidates. You won’t find any meaningful information in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch either. Local TV won’t cover the candidates positions either. It’s amazing that citizens are being asked to vote in elections where it is so incredibly difficult to learn about the candidates. This is the way things are, year after year. This year I decided to do something about the problem.

Based on hundreds of signs appearing on front yards in the Shaw Neighborhood of St. Louis (where I live), two of the Democrat candidates are especially active in the race for Alderman. The incumbent is Stephen Conway. Kevin McKinney is also vying for that office. Rather than rely on the sound-bite information on the yard signs and flyers, I decided to invite both candidates to my house to separately videotape 30-minute discussions of the issues with me. I posted both videos on my neighborhood website, and I have received considerable appreciation from my neighbors for providing this information. My role in offering to produce these videos was that of a citizen journalist. I wanted to do my part to make important information available to voters in an upcoming election.

This was a no-brainer, really. Simply post decent quality videos on YouTube where people can hear from the candidates in the privacy and comfort of their own homes.

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“The Imitation Game” is a poor imitation.

| January 12, 2015 | Reply

Saw “The Imitation Game” last night. Lots of eye candy (elaborate scenery, extras, vintage war footage) but as is so often the case, the film-makers forgot to pay enough attention to the screen play, which made cartoons of Alan Turing, his thought process and those he worked with. I can barely recommend it, despite that fact that his story is so incredibly compelling, heroic and, in the end, sad.

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“The Grapes of Wrath” (1940): Timely Viewing

| October 13, 2014 | 2 Replies

This afternoon, I just finished watching the 1940 film “The Grapes of Wrath” for the first time. I have never read the book either. What an amazing movie . [no need for a spoiler alert here]. No special effects; merely excellent writing that provokes genuine emotion and urge for social justice. Seems like a good film for right wing Republicans, who will see that, not long ago, it was poor Caucasian people getting shoved around for doing nothing wrong by police officers who reliably did the bidding of people of wealth.

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Man accepted by a pride of lions

| August 10, 2014 | Reply

This is amazing footage, indeed.

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Strangers slapping each other

| June 24, 2014 | Reply

From the film-maker who asked strangers to kiss each other, we now have stingers slapping each other.

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First Kiss

| March 10, 2014 | Reply
First Kiss

Remember this post describing a photographer’s project to ask two strangers to pose as if they knew each other intimately? In this new project, filmmaker Tatia Pilieva asked ten pairs of strangers to kiss each other — right after they met for the first time.

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The Polar Express: A Skeptical Review

| December 23, 2013 | Reply

PolarExpressI’d idly heard of the movie “The Polar Express” since it came out in 2004. This year, in a fit of holiday spirit, I queued it up on Netflix and played it through my Roku. I don’t know exactly what I expected from what was clearly a children’s Christmas movie, but it had moderately good reviews from a variety of sources.

Let me say up front that the animation was impressive; they managed to clear the edge of the Uncanny Valley on the almost believably human side. I enjoyed the attention to detail in the vintage buildings and the train itself. The many voices of Tom Hanks were also enjoyable, with clear jibes at famous phrases from some of his other movie appearances.

But the story was quite disturbing. It begins with a boy who is clearly climbing out of the pit of magical thinking and beginning to apply reason to observation, vis-a-vis Santa. But then he has a dream in which he is wooed by a stranger to get into a big dark vehicle to go somewhere unknown; a good message for any child? In this train, he meets a Disney cross section of humanity: Many white kids, a pale black girl, an ostracized poor kid, and a stereotypical Bronx Jewish know-it-all. Let’s ignore what this clearly Semitic character is doing on a train bound for Santa’s workshop.

The unnamed central character of the story is given several opportunities to show that he has superior morality, which I appreciate given his clearly agnostic bent. The other kids of deeper faith are mostly lacking empathy.

Anyway, after many improbable and long sequences of cartoon adrenaline action, they pass the Arctic Circle (accurately described as 66° North Latitude or about 2/3 of the way from the equator to the pole) and can see the North Pole itself (a few train lengths or 2,000 miles, depending on what you believe).

Once there, the agnostic protagonist, the poor kid, the dark girl, and the greedy Bronx kid get lost and only can find their way by following blind faith. In the end, our hero learns that he must ignore his intelligence and embrace total faith in the magical Mr. C. in order to function properly in society. The symbol of true faith in this story is being able to hear the sleigh bells. He could feel and see them all the time. But without faith, he was deaf to their mob-inspiring siren call. Yeah, the frenzy of the adoring mob when the bells rang was truly scary. Does anyone else notice the architectural similarities between the town square and the Vatican?

Anyway, when the lad of reinvigorated faith wakes from his epiphany, he notices that his parents, people of regularly declared faith, cannot actually hear the bells. They are just playing along, presumably for the safety of blending in. Our hero, in his adult voice-over condescension, claims to still hear the bells despite his near brush with rationality at the start of the story.

Anyway, the message of the film is clear: To be happy you must believe. To survive, at least pretend.

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Watch Candidate Obama debate President Obama on Civil liberties

| June 11, 2013 | 2 Replies

I have tried to point out the disparity between the policies that “Hope & Change”® Candidate Obama advocated and those pursued by “Look Forward, Not Back”® President Obama.

Now, a new video by Reddit’s “Restore the Fourth” movement highlights those differences. Watch and marvel as Candidate Obama debates President Obama on the proper role of civil liberties in our fight against terrorism:

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The Bechdel test for movies

| April 26, 2013 | Reply

The Bechdel Test is a simple test which names the following three criteria for rating movies: (1) it has to have at least two women in it, who (2) who talk to each other, about (3) something besides a man.

[Update 4/28/13]: More on the Bechdel test from the Double Parent, focusing on princesses who need to be rescued by a prince, many of these movies by Disney.

And . . . the story of Wonderwoman. You can view the entire one-hour video at PBS.

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