Christmas cards in Great Britain rarely contain religious images

December 14, 2006 | By | 1 Reply More

According to this article from the Boston Globe, Christianity is fading in Western Europe:

Nearly 99 percent of Christmas cards sold in Great Britain contain no religious message or imagery.

Traditional pictures such as angels blowing trumpets over a stable, Jesus in his manger, the shepherds and three wise men following the star to Bethlehem are dying out,” the Daily Mail reports. A review of some 5,500 Christmas cards turns up fewer than 70 that make any reference to the birth of Jesus. “Hundreds . . . avoided any image linked to Christmas at all” — even those with no spiritual significance, such as Christmas trees or Santa Claus.

Presumably the greeting-card industry is only supplying what the market demands; if Christian belief and practice weren’t vanishing from the British scene, Christian-themed cards wouldn’t be, either.

This makes me wonder why Mr. Bush would have choosen such an atheistic, and therefore per se immoral, group of people to be our primary ally to his so-called “War on Terror.”  Maybe that’s why things went so badly in Iraq.  Next time, he should pick a primary ally that at least puts manger scenes on their Christmas cards.

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Category: Iraq, Politics, Religion

About the Author ()

Erich Vieth is an attorney focusing on consumer law litigation and appellate practice. He is also a working musician and a writer, having founded Dangerous Intersection in 2006. Erich lives in the Shaw Neighborhood of St. Louis, Missouri, where he lives half-time with his two extraordinary daughters.

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  1. grumpypilgrim says:

    Erich wrote: "This makes me wonder why Mr. Bush would have choosen such an atheistic, and therefore per se immoral, group of people to be our primary ally to his so-called “War on Terror.” "

    Bush was desperate for allies, especially after Western European leaders rejected his ambition to invade Iraq, so he was undoubtedly happy to get whatever support he could find. He was able to purchase the support of some former Eastern Bloc countries by giving them hefty financial incentives (e.g., national debt relief), but he hit a wall with Western Europe, perhaps because those countries knew that invading Iraq would be a disaster — probably because they had closer economic ties to Iraq than did America and, thus, better political insight.

    What I don't understand is why Britain and Tony Blair supported Bush's invasion. I assume they were duped by Bush's phony linking of Saddam to the 9/11 attack, the latter of which did impact Britain, but this is just a guess.

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