The Immorality of Inquiry

| March 15, 2006 | 1 Reply

Consider, that many religions consider it immoral to do any of the following:

  • Ask certain obvious questions (Is there a God? Will God decide to abolish hell?)
  • Follow evidence wherever it leads. (Many Believers refuse to consider indisputable indicators demonstrating that the earth is actually more than 6,000 years old).
  • Admit that one does not really know (or that one doubts) the basic religious teachings of one’s church (Did Jesus actually and literally multiply loaves and fish?)
  • Depersonalize the study of why religions exist (They abhor the use of psychology, biology and the other sciences to consider whether there are demonstrable reasons other than truth that motivate religious Beliefs).
  • To buy enthusiastically into the scientific method (except to cherry-pick science to attack other people’s religions).

It’s not surprising, then, that religious differences are so often resolved by the use of force and violence.

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Category: Religion, Science

About the Author ()

Erich Vieth is an attorney focusing on consumer law litigation and appellate practice. He is also a working musician and a writer, having founded Dangerous Intersection in 2006. Erich lives in the Shaw Neighborhood of St. Louis, Missouri, where he lives half-time with his two extraordinary daughters.

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  1. grumpypilgrim says:

    “It’s not surprising, then, that religious differences are so often resolved by the use of force and violence.”

    I once heard it said that since there is no rational basis for resolving disputes about invisible supernatural events, the use of force and violence is the *only* way to resolve religious differences. Only secular government brought an end to the carnage (or, at least, is trying to).

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